The sun machine is coming down and we’re going to have a party.
I want to be a living work of art.

nowinexile:

The last words said by Black youth murdered by policemen. 

(via lipstick-feminists)

"O! more than moon,
Draw not up seas to drown me in thy sphere;
Weep me not dead, in thine arms, but forbear
To teach the sea, what it may do too soon;
Let not the wind
Example find
To do me more harm than it purposeth:
Since thou and I sigh one another’s breath,
Whoe’er sighs most is cruellest, and hastes the other’s death."

— Read T. C. Boyle’s heartbreaking The Love of My Life  (featuring John Donne’s “A Valediction of Weeping”)

No One Puts a Trigger Warning on Breakfast
"All the way from Dundarave, she had listened to herself talking and been dismayed. It wasn’t so much that she was prattling, saying just anything that came into her head; rather, that she was trying to express things that seemed to her interesting, or that might have been interesting if she could get them into shape. But they probably sounded pretentious, if not insane, rattled off in the way she was doing. She must seem like one of those women who are determined not to have an ordinary conversation but a real one. And even though she knew that nothing was working, that her talk must seem to him an imposition, she was unable to stop herself."

— from Alice Munro’s "What Is Remembered"

— “It Would” by Alice Notley

— “It Would” by Alice Notley


More dangerous than any words that come out of Lil’ Kim’s mouth are the forces of repressive puritanical morality that seek to silence her. Before talking to Kim, I spoke with lots of so-called cool folks who were putting her down, calling her a “ho…nothing but a prostitute.” Even the dudes who are into her gig — fans of her debut album, Hardcore (Undeas/Big Beat/Atlantic), and her work with Junior M.A.F.I.A — still see her as another version of “pussy galore”: a freak for their pleasure. And then there are the boys who pump her up as “sexy feminism.” Gimme a break! Ain’t nothing wrong with sex work, ‘cause a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do. And every girl I know who is working a sex tip has her reasons, but it ain’t about sexual freedom. It’s about getting paid. Lil’ Kim knows that. She’s seen and done it all. She knows when it’s fantasy and when it’s real, when it’s about getting paid or getting free.

— bell hooks and Lil Kim in Paper Magazine

More dangerous than any words that come out of Lil’ Kim’s mouth are the forces of repressive puritanical morality that seek to silence her. Before talking to Kim, I spoke with lots of so-called cool folks who were putting her down, calling her a “ho…nothing but a prostitute.” Even the dudes who are into her gig — fans of her debut album, Hardcore (Undeas/Big Beat/Atlantic), and her work with Junior M.A.F.I.A — still see her as another version of “pussy galore”: a freak for their pleasure. And then there are the boys who pump her up as “sexy feminism.” Gimme a break! Ain’t nothing wrong with sex work, ‘cause a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do. And every girl I know who is working a sex tip has her reasons, but it ain’t about sexual freedom. It’s about getting paid. Lil’ Kim knows that. She’s seen and done it all. She knows when it’s fantasy and when it’s real, when it’s about getting paid or getting free.

bell hooks and Lil Kim in Paper Magazine

(Source: apholo8, via keeponfloatinon)