I think that the strength of men is their great sense of immediacy. They are a now creature and a woman has strength to wait because she’s had to wait. She has to wait nine months for the concept of a child. Time is built into her body in the sense of becomingness. And she sees everything in terms of it being in the stage of becoming. She raises a child knowing not what it is at any moment but seeing always the person that it will become. Her whole life from her very beginning — it’s built into her — a sense of becoming.

— Maya Deren, avant-garde filmmaker, quoted in Ariana Reines’s "An Hourglass Figure: On Photographer Francesca Woodman"

I think that the strength of men is their great sense of immediacy. They are a now creature and a woman has strength to wait because she’s had to wait. She has to wait nine months for the concept of a child. Time is built into her body in the sense of becomingness. And she sees everything in terms of it being in the stage of becoming. She raises a child knowing not what it is at any moment but seeing always the person that it will become. Her whole life from her very beginning — it’s built into her — a sense of becoming.

— Maya Deren, avant-garde filmmaker, quoted in Ariana Reines’s "An Hourglass Figure: On Photographer Francesca Woodman"

Emmanuelle Riva
YOUR IMMORTAL SOULS OR YOUR EMPTY PURSES?
TABLOID

The book’s time pertains to the enclosure and topology of rooms, allegories, houses, bodies, surfaces. Perceiving’s time feels directional, melodic, lyric, inflectional. Then, because of the book’s time overlaying my own, living became exquisitely a problem.

—Lisa Roberston, “Time in the Codex”

The book’s time pertains to the enclosure and topology of rooms, allegories, houses, bodies, surfaces. Perceiving’s time feels directional, melodic, lyric, inflectional. Then, because of the book’s time overlaying my own, living became exquisitely a problem.

—Lisa Roberston, “Time in the Codex”

"She talked in and out of the movie, as if its enlarged characters were fragments escaped from her head and willfully acting out on their own, assuming the perfect narrative forms they were denied in life. It was like somebody in church repeating and affirming the minister’s sermon in noises and half syllables."

— Veronica, a novel by Mary Gaitskill

That’s the end of the message. I run out of things to say. Thank you.
She’s Alive!
Some work days you get to work on The Birds, and some work days you get to work on Jesse Stone. Luckily, there’s that moustache.

Some work days you get to work on The Birds, and some work days you get to work on Jesse Stone. Luckily, there’s that moustache.

""While there are more female characters on screen today, fewer stories are told from a female character’s perspective," the center’s executive director Martha Lauzen said, most likely because the man in charge was busy that day. Forging ahead adorably, she then added that the majority of the female characters who did make it on screen were younger than their male counterparts, less likely to be seen as leaders, and more likely to be "identified by their marital status," leaving the crucial factor of whether the audience was interested in having sex with them yet to be determined by a more in-depth study, you know, once the boys get around to it."

— from “Women still not being treated equally in movies, according to study conducted by women who totally would say that" by Sean O’Neal.